The Way of the Dead: Land, Class and Architecture

A long read but well worth the effort if you want to understand where we are today in terms of who owns the land in Britain and how it impacts upon our lives. There’s a lot of useful historical background in this piece and it makes you realise that when it comes to the ownership of vast swathes of this country, things haven’t changed for centuries…

architectsforsocialhousing

This summer I stayed on Dartmoor for a fortnight, and while there I visited the small village of Lydford. Walking from one end to the other in a few minutes, I found it hard to believe that a thousand years ago this was one of the four administrative centres for what is now Devon – second only to Exeter in population, more powerful than Barnstaple and Totnes. But while these estuary towns expanded with Britain’s maritime empire and the industrial revolution that brought the railways carrying goods and people to and from London, Lydford, located high up on the edge of the moor, declined. Today it has a population of just 450. But once it was the most important and feared town on Dartmoor, casting a shadow over its residents even darker than those that still fall on a winter’s night. I returned to the village and the surrounding area…

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Another ‘church and king’ mob?

The second appearance of the Football Lads Alliance (FLA) on the streets of London on Saturday 7th October is causing a fair amount of head scratching on our end of the political spectrum as people are working towards an understanding of where they’re coming from. The FLA march, numbered in the tens of thousands, was called in response to recent terror attacks in Britain. It took place when there was a break in the Premier League and Championship fixtures to accommodate the qualifying matches for the next World Cup, although Leagues One and Two and all of non league football went ahead as normal on the day.

Unlike the EDL in 2010, the two FLA marches that have been called so far have been completely devoid of national flags – all that has been seen have been club crests and insignia and wreaths in memory of those killed by terror attacks in Britain. It would seem that the organisers in the FLA are doing what they can to avoid their movement being accused of having fascist tendencies by discouraging displays of flags or political insignia associated with the far right. It’s this seemingly disciplined appearance that has got some people on our side wondering if there’s something new emerging that may be worth engaging with.

Some historical perspective is needed here… Type the phrase ‘church and king mob’ into any search engine and you’ll come up with plenty of pieces about reactionary mobs essentially doing the work of the ruling class in maintaining the established order and quelling dissent. Here’s one example of their manifestation: Priestly Riotshttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Priestley_Riots Here’s a lengthy examination of plebeian reaction which should inform our analysis of where the FLA are coming from: Popular Loyalism and Public Violence in the North-West of England, 1790-1800https://www.jstor.org/stable/4285276?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

These examples come in the period before industrialism and what’s considered to be the formation of the working class. While the Industrial Revolution did lead to class conflict and working class militancy, it never had the edge that would push it towards full blown revolution. This is because the British ruling class have always conceded just enough in the way of reforms to keep uprisings at bay. As the 19th century progressed into the 20th, it was the spoils of empire that would be used to pay for these reforms and concessions. Allied with some pretty effective propaganda, the ruling class have managed to keep the lid on any meaningful dissent that would threaten their interests. This piece in the Telegraph by the conservative writer Charles Moore acknowledges the contribution of these factors into creating the kind of working class Toryism that could well be informing the strategy of the FLA: A vast, loyal band of working-class Conservativeshttp://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/columnists/charlesmoore/7983677/A-vast-loyal-band-of-working-class-Conservatives.html

The FLA could be seen as a twenty first century manifestation of the traditional ‘church and king’ mob. This is what veteran anarchist, Martin Lux argues here: FOOTBALL LADS ALLIANCE “MARCH AGAINST TERRORISM”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fArtDmZS2RQ This is what was said about the English Defence League when they first emerged: The EDL: a “Church and King Mob”https://liveraf.wordpress.com/2010/12/17/the-edl-a-church-and-king-mob/ There are certainly fascists circling around the FLA looking for recruits to their cause and this has to be monitored. However, it could be said that the more patriotic, reactionary elements within the ranks of the FLA might find fascism a bit too ‘continental’ for their tastes and may well prefer a more historical form of reaction.

The FLA may like to think they’re countering the nihilistic, random terror inflicted by ISIS / Daesh. It has to be pointed out there there are people putting their lives on the line to fight ISIS / Daesh: War on Isis: Western fighters joining Kurds to fight terror group in Iraq and Syriahttp://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/western-fighters-joining-the-kurds-to-fight-isis-in-iraq-and-syria-a7041136.html while the likes of the FLA are merely posturing on the streets of London.

It could well be said that the FLA are unwittingly acting as the ‘useful idiots’ of the ruling class. While protesting against the likes of ISIS / Daesh, they were seemingly happy to march past near empty apartment blocks bought as ‘investment opportunities’ on Park Lane and in nearby Mayfair without batting an eyelid. Whether this is through ignorance or an unhealthy level of deference to the super rich is a matter for debate. The fact is that the FLA are acting as a diversion from the real forces that are screwing us over. A diversion that the establishment must be privately celebrating as yet again, they get let off the hook.

How do we deal with the FLA? We haven’t got all the answers yet but we would like to offer a few suggestions. Calling them fascists is counter-productive – as stated earlier, fascism’s a bit too ‘continental’ for people who prefer a more traditional form of expression for their patriotism and reaction. A degree of historical understanding of reactionary elements within the working class in Britain is needed to inform any strategy that needs to be devised to counter the FLA – some of the links listed above are a tentative start to this process. Exposing the reactionary elements in the FLA as the ‘useful idiots’ of the ruling class is essential but that can only be done if we can successfully articulate our vision of what working class solidarity should be.

To say that the project of articulating a vision of working class solidarity has been undermined by the rise of identity politics is an understatement! However, that is an ongoing debate which we have touched on in previous posts in On Uncertain Ground and one we intend to return to in the future. To conclude, this post has to be seen as our initial reaction to the rise of the FLA and as a work in progress that will hopefully be part of a constructive debate on how we deal with this latest manifestation on the streets.

Trying to find a way forward

Where we are

Surveying the political, economic and social landscape, the curse ‘may you live in interesting times’ has never seemed more apt. The last couple of years have seen a series of political events that have caught most commentators off guard and there’s a feeling that the world is becoming more unpredictable and volatile by the day. To any rational observer of a radical persuasion, it’s clear that the political, economic and social system we live under is in crisis. Just one symptom of this are the divisions among our so called rulers over Brexit – these are not just about the arguments for and against but also what it actually means and how to implement it. They’re giving every appearance of not having a clue and are basically winging it from day to day.

We’re in a situation where a reasonably united radical movement should be putting a fractured, divided ruling class on the ropes while pressing the case for fundamental change and the overthrow of a system that’s reaching its use by date. There are groups and people out there fighting the fight but the ones we’ve worked with and stood alongside in solidarity tend to come from outside of anarchism. Focus E15 and Movement For Justice are two we’ve stood with this year in various forms, mainly because they get on with the job and aren’t prone to endless pontificating – more on this later…

What follows is a subjective piece based on our experiences. We hope people will recognise that we’re using these experiences as our contribution to what needs to be a constructive discussion on moving the various currents of opposition that are around forwards in a way that brings about a badly needed element of unity.

Building from the grassroots upwards

When it comes to ways of building a movement that’ll bring about fundamental change, there has to be a base at the grassroots on our estates and in our neighborhoods, in our workplaces and our colleges. As to how building from the grassroots happens, sorry folks, there’s no definitive template you can apply. From our experience in working with Basildon & Southend Housing Action (BASHA) every estate is different and has it’s own issues and characters. It’s a case of learning from the experiences of others and then working out how to apply them to the situation you’re facing while always bearing in mind the ultimate aim of what you want to achieve. What follows are our experiences of working at the level of the estate and neighbourhood…

There was one very important lesson we learnt from our Independent Working Class Association (IWCA) days, particularly when we stood in the local elections in the Stanford East & Corringham Town ward in 2007 and 2008. The lesson was that the vast majority of people are apolitical and generally don’t think about politics until it’s coming close to voting day. That’s if they’re intending to vote – bear in mind that when it comes to local elections in our area, the participation rate tends to hover round the 30% mark. Another lesson is that when you start talking to people on the doorstep, pinning them down to a particular part of the political spectrum is not easy. Someone may be quite radical on some issues but reactionary on others – you just have to use your own political nous to decide if there’s a basis for a dialogue in these situations.

Doorstepping isn’t the time or place to start adopting a holier than thou attitude with the person you’re talking to. We found that listening to someone in order to understand where they’re coming from without interrupting or hectoring them generally earned us enough respect to start a dialogue or debate. Sure, we did come across a few hardened racists and bigots and it soon became clear we’d be wasting our time pursing the argument with them as well as potentially compromising our own security. In those situations, we found it best to politely terminate the exchange and move on while making a mental note of where the bigots lived.

When it comes to gaining respect, one thing we have found from our experience that works is getting your hands dirty by getting stuck in on activities such as a neighbourhood clean up or building a community garden. Whether it’s organising it, facilitating the residents in running it or going along and learning some lessons from well organised residents who know what they’re doing will depend on the situation you face on the ground. The thing is getting stuck in and being seen to do so…

To reiterate, it’s a case of what needs to be done and what works given the circumstances and the resources to hand. Our experiences are determined by the demographic we’re dealing with and the political colour of the local authority area we’re working in. The issues and solutions we deal with and offer are going to be very much different from those facing activists in a London borough such as Newham. Having said that, the experiences of activists operating in all areas regardless of the different circumstances they may be encountering need to be shared to put all of our struggles into a broader, unifying context.

Getting the propaganda right

From our experiences with the IWCA and subsequently working with BASHA, we’ve realised that writing propaganda that appeals to ordinary working class people is a tough call. With the Stirrer and it’s predecessor the Heckler, we still feel that we’re on a learning curve and that we’ve still got a fair way to go before we really crack this one. We’re trying to do a number of different things with our blogs and papers…

Firstly, we’re trying to put our anarchist / radical spin on events happening across the area we cover and using that to point out that the system we have is no longer fit for purpose. We’re trying to do this in a way that’s not preachy or hectoring and acknowledges that there are a fair number of people who have been at the wrong end of the system and are sceptical about what (if anything) it has to offer. If we’re writing about the situation on some of the more troubled estates such as the ¾ in Vange, we’re acutely aware residents there know what’s wrong and what they want are some pointers or support that will start to bring about change.

Secondly, we’re doing our level best to inspire people to start changing things on their estates and in their neighbourhoods. Along with our partners at BASHA, we can’t be and don’t want to be everywhere leading the fight for change. We actively want people and groups to start agitating and organising for change on their own account with our role being to nudge them in the right direction when it comes to their politics and analysis and to offer practical support as and when we can.

With facilitating grassroots action there really is no blueprint for how to do this – it’s entirely dependent on the individuals making up the group who want your assistance. Sometimes you have to accept that there’s going to have to be a bit of a political journey, at others times you may be pleasantly surprised at how much people actually ‘get it’. We have to start with where people actually are and work from that point because a perfectly formed group with just the right politics just isn’t going to pop up in your neighbourhood in the current political and social climate. Which means that we cannot afford to sit back when it comes to our propaganda – it’s something we constantly review and if it’s not working, it gets changed and will keep on being changed until it does bloody work!

The point we’re trying to convey is that all of us need to think about the audiences our propaganda is aimed at and what results we want from disseminating it. This is as much a reminder to ourselves as it is pointing out that a lot of material produced by radical and anarchist groups could be a lot better. We’ve probably been as guilty as everyone else of turning out papers and blog posts for the sake of it rather than thinking what we want to get from each one. It’s relatively easy to write material for people who are already engaged in politics and activism – it’s a lot harder coming up with something that will appeal to and engage people who are pissed off with the way things are going but have had no prior involvement with political or campaigning activity.

Building alliances

When it comes to alliances, out here in southern Essex, we take a pragmatic attitude. We cannot afford to be political purists – if we were, we would be very lonely… So yes, despite the bashing of Labour’s shameful record on social cleansing in London in the name of ‘re-generation’, if our friends at BASHA find a Labour councillor who can work the system and get things done for them on the estates, we’re happy to use them to secure our aims – the emphasis being on ‘use’… Resident and neighbourhood action groups come in all shapes and sizes – while we always undertake a process of due diligence on them, on the basis that we start with where people are, more often than not, we’ll work with them.

When it comes to working with political groups anarchist or otherwise, it can prove to be a little bit problematical… We work with Class War on housing and other issues as well but as for the other anarchists in London, sadly we’re wondering where they are a lot of the time… As stated earlier, we’re pragmatists and if a group is heading in the same broad direction of travel that we are on an issue such as housing, we’ll work and stand in solidarity with them.

Which is why we’ve stood in solidarity with Focus E15 a fair few times over the last couple of years, not least because social cleansing from Newham has a direct impact on the housing situation out here in Essex. Yes, we’re well aware that the work of Focus E15 is facilitated by the Revolutionary Communist Group (RCG) and as anarchists, we shouldn’t have anything to do with them. Sure we don’t see eye to eye with the RCG on everything but where it counts for us on issues such as housing we do. They stepped up to the plate a few years back to facilitate Focus E15 and for us as housing activists, to not work with them because of differences over what happened a hundred years ago during the Russian Revolution would be a gross dereliction of our duty.

Given the way things are going and the threats we face, we need allies. It doesn’t have to be any formal alliance – just a tacit understanding that on certain issues we have a common aim and that it makes sense to work together on those issues. We see this as a fluid, flexible way of working where we work together with groups as and when the need arises and not get too hung up about differences while we’re trying to get a result. Taking this stance means we tend to work alongside groups who are at the sharp end of things and who generally are happy to work in flexible alliances as and when required. Just imagine what could be achieved if people just eased off the dogma pedal a bit and took a more open approach to who they worked with…

Identity politics has to recognise the need for unity

On the issue of the dogma pedal, there’s a worrying tendency where certain strands of thinking on identity politics allied with an unhelpful and often toxic call out culture are getting a stranglehold on radicalism with activists being driven away. We have written about this here: The perils of ‘call out’ culturehttps://onuncertainground.wordpress.com/2017/03/07/the-perils-of-call-out-culture/ For the record, this is what we’ve had to say about the issue of identity: Is identity fixed or does it change?https://onuncertainground.wordpress.com/2017/02/22/is-identity-fixed-or-does-it-change/ While we have some very strong reservations about identity politics and the call out culture that accompanies it, there are certain strands of thinking on intersectionalism that make some useful and salient points: Intersectionality – some tentative thoughtshttps://onuncertainground.wordpress.com/2017/03/09/intersectionality-some-tentative-thoughts/ We’re giving you these links rather than re-hashing all of the arguments here in this piece which would make it unwieldy to say the least…

We understand that identity politics had its origins with particular oppressed groups justifiably fighting for their rights. What concerns us is the way that some people have twisted the meaning of identity politics so that it becomes a parade of competing victimhoods as opposed to a fight against oppression. Which is why we see hope in some currents of intersectionalism which while they draw attention to the varying and sometimes shifting oppressions people experience, they’re placed in a broader structural context and seek to aggregate the different struggles people are pursuing. This may well be over-simplifying things but while we have no issue with people’s different experiences and cultural backgrounds being respected, we want to see unity when it come to the fight for justice. As a matter of urgency, we have to work out what unites us so we can build the movement we need, sooner rather than later.

We’ll say it again – we’re in a period of great uncertainty and potential volatility… If the various strands of radicalism and anarchism could bury their differences and work together, the current situation could be the best opportunity we’ve had in a generation or more to seriously start to bring about radical change. However, if the current level of toxic fractiousness that’s all too prevalent in radicalism continues unchecked and we remain divided and fighting among our selves, we’re facing the direst threat there’s been for many generations.

We’re not just talking about the threat to us as activists which potentially is dire enough but to the working class, regardless of ethnicity, race or gender who as we’ve already seen with social cleansing from London and the Grenfell Tower disaster, face a direct threat to their existence. A fair number of middle class activists may not see this threat – those at the sharp end being forced out of the capital or having to constantly look over their shoulder in fear of the immigration squads or a racist attack live with it every moment of their lives. In these circumstances, can we really afford to continue to squabble among ourselves?

It has to be said it’s given us no pleasure to have to write it. We want to find ways of moving things forward in what is a challenging and difficult period so we can all realise our aim of overthrowing the crap we have to put up with and bring in a saner, just, equitable and sustainable society. We’re aware that many of you will not agree with this piece. For the record, we’re more than happy to receive constructive criticism and engage in a reasoned debate about the points we’ve raised.

What is ‘Liberation Permaculture’

Is permaculture about re-creating Eden or about changing the world in every way, even politically? Graham Burnett and Nicole Vosper make the case for a politically engaged, ‘liberation permaculture’ – https://www.permaculture.co.uk/articles/what-liberation-permaculture

This is from two people we have a lot of respect for making the case for a permaculture that will bring about fundamental social change as opposed to one that’s simply a lifestyle choice made by people who want to opt out of the modern world but who have no real interest in changing it. It’s an old piece but one that’s probably even more relevant now than when it was written, given the narrative of change coming from an individual altering their lifestyle as opposed to more politically conscious collective endeavours that seek to not only challenge but overthrow the system. It’s about siding with the oppressed and showing solidarity for their struggles for liberation as opposed to a lifestyle change that simply makes you feel good but does sod all to overthrow a system that is moving well beyond it’s use by date.

EVERYTHING TO GAIN (and everything to lose)

Editor’s note: This was originally published on our sister blog, The South Essex STIRRER as a kind of a call to arms. However, as it (hopefully) makes some contribution to the discussion about where radicalism needs to go in these troubled times, it’s worth publishing it here on this blog as well…

We’re entering a period of instability – all that’s solid seems to be melting into air. With an indecisive election and Brexit negotiations descending to the level of farce, our so called rulers look weaker and more divided than ever before. The faction ridden ruling elite of this country have embarked on the first stages of Brexit negotiations with no clear idea of what they want or how they’re going to get it. A fractured so called party of government seems to be more fixated on who’s going to replace the hapless Theresa May as prime minister and leader rather than getting it’s head around understanding exactly what Brexit entails.

A breakdown of trust

At local council level, councillors and council officers all too often are found to be self serving and incompetent. The Grenfell Tower disaster showed up the so called ruling elite at the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea as arrogant, out of touch and uncaring – it was ordinary people on the ground who took over the initial relief and recovery effort while the authorities floundered around.

Across the south of Essex, we struggle to find anyone who has a good word to say about their local authorities. Southend Council are obsessed with pointless vanity projects such as the museum on the cliff top instead of addressing the homelessness crisis in the town. Basildon Council can’t even organise a weekly rubbish collection on estates such as the ¾ in Vange without leaving bags of uncollected rubbish strewn all over the place. Thurrock Council are in full control freak mode attempting to dictate which media outlets can and can’t report on their proceedings and refusing members of campaign groups the right to ask questions at council meetings. People are losing what little faith they had in local councils to do the job of serving the public…

Whether, it’s at national or local level, trust in governance is declining, yet nothing appears to be happening to bring about real change. Much of the left has been subsumed into the bizarre cult of Jeremy Corbyn, buying into the deluded notion that should he manage to form a government, everything will be all right. The Corbynistas need to take a look at the dismal record of London Labour councils when it comes to socially cleansing the working class from London in the name of ‘regeneration’ – maybe that would give them the reality check they need. Everyone else appears to be just hunkering down and getting on with things as best they can…

There has to be a challenge

While the powers that be are divided and appear to be blundering from one crisis to another without a clue as to where they’re going or what they’re doing, they’ll continue to get away with it until there’s a serious challenge from below. At the moment there appears to be no sense of an opposition that can pose a real threat to the status quo, let alone a desire to move beyond the dysfunctional world we have to endure and build a more just, equitable and sustainable one. While this state of affairs continues, the ruling class can stagger from one crisis to the next safe in the knowledge that in the form of the state, they have the monopoly on the force that’s needed to keep their grip on power, regardless of how tenuous that may seem to be.

While the majority of people are under the illusion that things will be all right and thinks that the third of society that’s suffering needs to get its act together, there will never be a serious challenge to the system. Should things go seriously wrong as a result of another financial crisis or the Brexit process leading to a black swan event, then a large proportion of the population will be screwed. If there’s no significant radical movement in place by that point, we’re in serious trouble.

With the ruling class as divided as it is now, we have the best opportunity there’s been for a long while to build a movement that will bring about fundamental change through collective struggle. That movement can only be built from the grassroots upwards – waiting for the messiah in the form of Jeremy Corbyn will not bring about the change that’s needed. As the title of this piece says, there’s everything to gain if we can get our act together and build that movement. If we can’t, then as the bracketed subtitle suggests, there’s everything to lose…

Enough is enough…

On the evening on July 19th, I attended the protest organised by Justice 4 Grenfell outside Kensington Town Hall where the council were having their first full meeting since the Grenfell Tower disaster on June 14th: Elizabeth Campbell: New council leader in charge of Grenfell Tower disaster not resigning ‘yet’ after furious backlashhttp://www.itv.com/news/2017-07-19/new-council-leader-heckled-and-booed-at-grenfell-tower-disaster-meeting/ As soon as I arrived at the protest, the first thing I saw was the inevitable SWP stall strategically placed at the entrance to the piazza at the side of the town hall. This meant that pretty much everyone who wanted to attend the protest or watch the live feed of the council meeting being shown on the big screen at the back of the piazza had to walk past the SWP stall and their paper hawkers.

It was the same at the People’s Assembly Tories Out! ‘protest’ that took place on Saturday 1st July – the first thing I saw was the inevitable SWP red gazebos, paper sellers everywhere and thousands of their sodding placards. Going back to the People’s Assembly ‘protest’ in Parliament Square on June 10th, the first Saturday after the general election and again, the first thing I saw was the red SWP gazebos, paper sellers and hundreds of their placards. The key themes of both of these ‘protests’ was ensuring that they ran to a pre-determined script with loads of speeches, musical ‘entertainment’ and choreographed chanting. All enforced by the likes of the SWP, union bureaucrats, Momentum activists and various Trot hangers on. Enforced to the point where these hacks were more than happy to ask the cops to arrest comrades who didn’t want to stick to their script…

When it comes to the big set pieces organised by the likes of the People’s Assembly, the inevitable presence of the SWP / Trots seems to have been accepted as a given. Fortunately, these big set pieces aren’t the only game in town and there are other campaigns and groups achieving results on their own terms. In no particular order, here are a few examples of what can be and is being achieved… Firstly, the United Voices Of The World union who amongst other fights have chalked up yet another victory with the reinstatement of a sacked cleaner at the London School of Economics – the fifth one they’ve got reinstated in a year – https://www.facebook.com/uvwunion/ There’s Focus E15 who have been tirelessly fighting to expose and challenge the shameful record of Newham Council on social cleansing – https://www.facebook.com/focuse15/ Then there’s Movement For Justice – https://www.facebook.com/movementforjustice/ – who have been involved in campaigns and actions ranging from defending migrant rights through to supporting striking cleaners at Barts Hospital to name just two of the many issues they’re involved in.

What riles me is the way the SWP / Trots blatantly try to hi-jack legitimate campaigns. When there have been local protests in London, particularly over housing issues, as was seen in Haringey on the evening of Monday 3rd July when there was a protest against the implementation of the Haringey Development Vehicle (HDV), the likes of the SWP have been all over them trying to co-opt and control what’s happening. One activist from an estate facing obliteration by the HDV took one look at the assembled SWP members as the march was forming up, took the principled decision he didn’t want to be associated with them in any way, shape or form, got back on his bike and rode away.

What really sticks in the craws of a lot of people is the way the SWP / Trots have been trying to latch onto the Grenfell Tower disaster. From what I’ve heard, their attempts to do that in the immediate neighbourhood of Grenfell Tower have been rebuffed by locals who can see their agenda for what it is and rightly want nothing to do with a bunch of shameless political opportunists. However, that did not stop the SWP / Trots from doing their level best with the Justice 4 Grenfell protest on 19th July to try and dictate what was going to happen that night. This was apparent from their organising a rota of speakers that wasn’t exactly representative of the local community around Grenfell Tower through to heavy censorship and deletion of posts and threads on the Facebook page promoting the event. Not to mention their organisers openly talking to the cops and pointing out individuals whose presence they were unhappy about…

Fortunately there were people and groups there who weren’t buying the SWP / Trot agenda and who set up an open mike on the steps leading up to the town hall. This allowed locals from the estate to have their say as well as housing campaigners from the RCG, Class War and Movement For Justice to name a few. In effect, there were two rallies going on side by side for a period… After a while, I went over to the piazza where the proceedings from the council chamber were being broadcast and survivors from Grenfell Tower and residents from the surrounding estates were allowed to speak to the council. The contrast between the dignity, passion and rightful anger of the survivors speaking in the chamber and the shameless opportunism of the SWP skulking around outside trying to flog their papers couldn’t have been starker. By the time I had to leave, the SWP had pretty much given up and were departing, leaving people mainly from the Grenfell Tower area to continue to watch the proceedings from the council chamber. That to me speaks volumes and offers some hope for the future…

From what I’ve seen and heard of the survivors from Grenfell Tower and residents from the surrounding estates, I can’t see them tolerating the likes of the SWP / Trots attempting to muscle their way in and hi-jack their fight for justice. The SWP / Trots are in their comfort zone when it comes to co-opting protests – out on the estates, it’s a completely different matter. When people on the estates start to fully comprehend the threat posed to them by social cleansing, they won’t have time for an SWP / Trot agenda of getting Jeremy Corbyn elected as PM and a strategy of trying to keep the lid on simmering social tensions until that happens. Offering solidarity to the people on the estates and where necessary, facilitating them to get get their voices heard and build effective resistance networks is a way forward that will bring about a meaningful challenge to the system…

The SWP / Trots are currently standing in the way of building a genuine challenge to the system. With creative thinking plus some hard graft on the estates, it’s possible to bypass their stifling, stale agenda and build a grassroots movement that has a real sense of its own autonomy and strength. Recent events where it feels as though the SWP / Trots have swamped everything may have left us feeling dispirited but, when you stand back and take a look at the situation, there are openings where grassroots campaigns can bypass them and dump them in the dustbin of history…

Dave (the editor)

The toxic impact of the cult of Corbyn

The People’s Assembly organised Tories Out! protest that took place on Saturday 1st July was to all intents and purposes, a Jeremy Corbyn love-fest. Apart from Class War, Plan C and a few other independently minded groups and individuals, the vast majority of the attendees at the march were there for the uncritical worship of Jeremy Corbyn. For the record, Class War left the march at the halfway point, unable to bear listening to one more chorus of ‘Oh, Jeremy Corbyn!’ without losing it, to retire to a pub for a drink and to hatch a plan for an intervention at Parliament Square later on in the proceedings: Oh, Jeremy Corbyn! The People’s Assemblyhttps://architectsforsocialhousing.wordpress.com/2017/07/02/oh-jeremy-corbyn-the-peoples-assembly/

The aim of the intervention was to publicly challenge Corbyn on the record of London Labour councils on social cleansing carried out in the name of ‘re-generation’. For the record, I was one of the small group of Class War activists that carried out the intervention at the back of the stage in Parliament Square. A chance encounter with Len McCluskey as he departed from the back of the stage after speaking was a fortuitous bonus in that it prompted us to kickstart the intervention – he was vigorously challenged on the record of London Labour councils. The reaction of the assembled crowd at the back of the stage to the intervention was mixed – it didn’t turn into the lynch mob I was expecting. There were a number of people who while they disagreed strongly with the aim and tone of the intervention, rather than simply hurl abuse, did engage in some heated arguments with us – fair enough, heated arguments are what I thrive on! There were also enough curious bystanders to accept copies of the Class War paper when I decided to do an impromptu paper distribution while we were waiting for the Messiah in the form of Corbyn to turn up.

However, there were some fanatical Corbynistas who not only refused to engage with us but actively tried to drown us out by singing ‘Oh, Jeremy Corbyn!’ over and over again. It was at this point that the irrationality of the cult of Corbyn really started to hit home with a vengeance. The more fanatical element don’t see the need to engage in any form of debate or argument – all they do is endlessly repeat the name of their beloved leader. Once Corbyn rocked up behind the stage and we’d conducted the final part of our intervention, we then swiftly departed to return to the pub. We walked past Parliament Square at the the precise moment that Corbyn made his appearance on the stage. The chorus of ‘Oh, Jeremy Corbyn!’ from the assembled crowd seemed to reach a new, feverish height. While we were buzzing from the intervention we had made, at the same time, there was a disconcerting unease at the uncritical irrationality of the cult like worship of one individual.

Here we are in the 21st century and we’ve witnessed a square full of mainly well educated, predominantly middle class people singing the name of their hero over and over again. We’re talking about people, many of whom have been through higher education and university and supposedly imbued with the gift of critical thinking, mindlessly singing the name of their political hero. I know we’re living in what could be described as ‘interesting times’ but the level of irrationality that’s characterising politics is profoundly disturbing. We’ve seen the irrationality of the right at the Trump rallies during the US presidential elections last year and the scary slide towards ethno-nationalism across Europe. The left were incredibly vocal at the time in their condemnation of the mob mentality that was coming to the fore at some of the Trump rallies. Well, with the increasingly irrational, uncritical atmosphere at the Corbyn rallies over here, it’s becoming a case of the pot calling the kettle black!

The problem with the Corbynistas is that despite being presented with ample evidence of the complicity of London Labour councils in social cleansing, they’re in denial about it. Blind belief is over-riding thoroughly researched, fact based evidence. Even when Corbyn supporters acknowledge there’s a problem, they blame it on the Progress / Blairite faction of the party while claiming that it’s only Corbyn that has the power to purge these elements and thus put an end to the policies. The point is that Corbyn is well aware of what’s going on and in a cynical bid to gain power, he’s attempting to sweep the dismal record of London Labour councils under the carpet. Which may explain his extreme discomfort at being confronted with this record by a Class War activist on Saturday July 1st. As for what Corbyn really knows, we’ll leave it for our associates at Architects 4 Social Housing to explain in forensic detail: Jeremy Corbyn and the Haringey Development Vehiclehttps://architectsforsocialhousing.wordpress.com/2017/07/04/jeremy-corbyn-and-the-haringey-development-vehicle/

The obsession with Corbyn has gone a fair way to neutering radical action on the streets as a worrying number of so called radicals seem to be placing their faith in him eventually triumphing at the ballot box. Apart from the choreographed demonstration we witnessed on July 1st, independent, autonomous street actions seem to be few and far between these days. When there have been local protests in London, particularly over housing issues, as was seen in Haringey on the evening of Monday 3rd July when there was a protest against the implementation of the Haringey Development Vehicle (HDV), the likes of the Socialist Workers Party (SWP) are all over them trying to co-opt and control what’s happening. One activist from an estate facing obliteration by the HDV took one look at the assembled SWP members as the march was forming up, took the principled decision he didn’t want to be associated with them in any way, shape or form, got back on his bike and rode away.

Every time the SWP co-opt a protest, they effectively throw a fire safety blanket over it, stifling any real anger that may lead to things getting out of control (for them). This is happening because the SWP have taken on board the agenda of supporting Corbyn, so as far as they’re concerned, any protest on housing issues in London has to be co-opted and managed by them to keep it on message and to stop the truth coming out. Not being based in London, I’m not up to speed on the exact details of what’s going on the estates across the capital that are under threat from ‘re-generation’. What I have managed to gather is that while the likes of the SWP and the Corbynistas are trying to co-opt and ‘manage’ resistance to estate demolition, many of the people on the estates are not buying it. This leaves some hope that genuinely, independent, autonomous and militant campaigns will start to prevail at some point.

What has to be born in mind is that the seemingly uncritical hero worship of Corbyn and the antics of the likes of the SWP is taking place inside an activist bubble. It’s an activist bubble that’s not even reaching the vast majority of residents on the estates in London who are threatened by ‘re-generation’. There’s a political vacuum here that needs to be filled… When you get out to the estates of Thurrock and Basildon where I operate, it’s a welcome reality check in that hardly anyone is talking about Corbyn and the SWP are non-existent! However, while on the one hand it’s refreshing to have a reality check, on the other, it’s an indication that there is a massive political vacuum that is waiting to be filled and there are plenty of the wrong elements around who would like to fill it. Which is why, in conjunction with comrades from Basildon & Southend Housing Action, we’ve produced this flyer to explain the realities of the housing crisis to folk out here…

With the Corbynistas and the Trots of the SWP, when it comes to operating in London, it’s hard to try and carve out an independent space we can operate in. In their own way, Class War and Plan C made a decent attempt to do that at the Tories Out! Protest on Saturday 1st July. It did occur to me that with the Class War intervention, given the hostility to the Corbynistas and Trots surrounding us, it was almost felt like we were counter-demonstrators who had managed to infiltrate the protest! It did lead me to wonder at what stage do we simply launch our own counter protest rather than bother to join another People’s Assembly point A to point B affair? Suffice to say, some serious and creative thinking on strategy and tactics is needed to enable genuine radicalism to carve out the space it needs to get its voice heard and to mobilise people into action.

Dave (the editor)